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If you’re into tattoos, bioengineering and high-tech health-sensing devices, this new development may be just the thing for you. A new project completed as a collaboration between researchers at MIT and Harvard Medical School has resulted in a prototype ‘tattoo’ that changes colour in response to variations in certain health metrics, and can be read through the skin. This clinical ink has been shown to be able to indicate skin pH, glucose and sodium levels.

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End stage liver diseases, such as Stage 4 cirrhosis takes the lives of about 10,000 people every year in the United States, and unfortunately this number only seems to be increasing.

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For years, scientists have been searching for a medical adhesive that stays sticky when wet and does not cause irritation. Medical glue, or tissue adhesives, are becoming more and more popular as an alternative to staples or stitches. Currently, most glues available do not exhibit a high level of biocompatibility and also do not always match the mechanical properties of the tissues they’re attached to.

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Worldwide, 37 million people are infected with HIV. New research suggests that early treatment given to children born with the disease may help them control it in later life, without the need for daily medication in the form of antiretroviral therapy (ART).

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Dyslexia is characterized by trouble reading, despite normal or above average intelligence. Problems may include difficulties in spelling or pronouncing words, reading quickly, writing words and understanding what one reads.Galexia is an interactive game app for smartphones that notably improves the reading and writing ability of children with dyslexia.

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Worldwide, the number of people suffering from depression is startling. Every year, it affects over 300 million people, with around 800,000 of those committing suicide. Whilst our environment and experiences certainly play a role, our genes also have a central part to play. As a result, a team from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, led by Dr. Mary Kay Lobo, has been working to determine exactly which genes could be responsible for depression.

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Malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Zika and other mosquito-borne illnesses have wreaked havoc among humans in the past, and are continuing to do so by taking lives irrespective of age, gender or status. Among these, malaria, the deadliest of all, affects more than half the world’s population. Fortunately, innovations in biotechnology are attempting to provide solutions to eradicate these maladies.

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The internet, one of man’s greatest discoveries, is now literally at our fingertips. Though it is highly developed and talks of a progressive society, there are some downsides too: cyber-crimes that affect the lives of many. It has recently come to light that such issues can also extend into areas of medicine.

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Scientists have been researching Parkinson’s for many decades and have this week come one step closer to a better understanding of the condition. Their research confirms the inkling that scientists have had for nearly 100 years, namely that a ‘faulty’ immune system is partly to blame. This finding is significant because it raises hope that the nerve death associated with Parkinson’s could be prevented by therapies that focus on the immune system.

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Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have completed research looking at brain activity during sleep. The research was extensive, with some extraordinary results.

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A new approach to the treatment of prostate cancer could revolutionize how medical professionals treat

Nicholas James, lead author of the study and Professor of Clinical Oncology at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, UK said “Based on the magnitude of clinical benefit, we believe that the upfront care for patients newly diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer should change.

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Clinical depression has the symptoms of fear, anxiety, stress, frustration, despair, guilt, exhaustion, pain and anxiety. Many times is the road to suicide. Depression is a huge threat to human health. Every person has time lapses with depression. But how can we cure us, definitively? This is the question that matters.

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Each year, it’s estimated that nearly 800,000 people commit suicide. The World Health Organization suggest that for every person who died of suicide, there may well be 20 others attempting suicide. The reasons behind suicide attempts are complex, but effective intervention can certainly help reduce the current rate.

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An estimated 23% of the world’s population now live in cities, far from the reaches of farmland, making access and the transport of fresh food an everyday struggle in terms of cost, labor and unpredictable weather conditions.

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Drug and antibiotic resistance, considered a bane in the scientific and developing world, has affected our communities and society as a whole. In fact, this phenomenon is hazardous, not just to the current generation’s immunity but also affects their offspring. According to the CDC, as of 2013, 2 million Americans each year are found to be invulnerable to antibiotics, with more than 20,000 dying from infections caused by resistant bacteria.

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Researchers at the University “Carlos III” in Madrid have developed a virtual reality system for rehabilitation of the shoulder. It includes a built-in movement sensor and allows the patient to do controlled exercises as part of a football game.

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Music should strike fire from the heart of man, and bring tears from the eyes of woman” -Ludwig van Beethoven

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A recent study carried out at the Massachusetts General Hospital shows that practicing the ancient Chinese martial art of Tai Chi may help to reduce symptoms of depression.

The study focused on members of Boston’s Chinese community, who enjoy tai chi, but tend to avoid conventional treatments for depression. Whilst tai chi has long been considered beneficial for stress reduction and anxiety, no studies have been carried out into its effects on depression.

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An all-female team of scientists have just created the first 3D printed ovary, in a first step towards a potential method of restoring fertility in young cancer patients.

These cancer patients have had their fertility compromised by treatments they received either as children, or adults. The idea is to provide them with a bioprosthetic ovary which restores both correct hormone levels and fertility, allowing them to have children.

The team, from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and McCormick School of Engineering, had quite a challenge on their hands.

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The brain is the most complex structure in our body. It has more than 200 billion neurons, which are all interconnected in specific orders. This creates synapses, which are the neurotransmitters. Between these synapses, signals are transferred and this in turn creates a circuit.

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