Technology

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Machine Learning (ML), along with the Internet of Things (IoT) seems to be the next big revolution in science and technology. AI experts are debating why machine learning is the most wondrous thing, today.

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In the field of science and technology, every action has a reaction. It is in this way, we, as a generation, move forward.

The city of Atlanta, a few months ago, had experienced a ransomware cyberattack that paralyzed its government. The attack had a direct effect on access to government websites causing approximately 6 million people to be affected. There are still ongoing efforts to get these critical systems back online.

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There is a depressing quote concerning the ability of false information to outpace a more verifiable counterpart among human beings. Furthermore, it has many versions and variations, some of which are attributed to more than one author. However, it appears that including a wrongful citation would ensure that it would be repeated far earlier and far more often. This would be in keeping with the message of the quote – and would also be substantiated by scientific evidence.

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Why would robots want to mimic spiders? So they can jump, according to robotics professor Mostafa Nabawy, during his keynote speech at the Industry 4.0 event. This summit had been set up so that academics could showcase their ideas and theories for what they call ‘the next Industrial Revolution’. This concept centres on the role of upcoming technology in the progression and advancement of global industry – robotics included. Dr.

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Technology is rapidly changing the world, and innovations are being developed that will redefine how we live. Here at Evolving Science we have examined how electric cars will be charged on the go, and looked at how a smart homes are almost a reality in our article ‘Control Your Home, Control Your World’.

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One of the many reasons that companies choose to automate some of their systems is to reduce human error and ensure a consistent quality of product.

Whilst it might seem surprising to think of that same logic being applied to the training of racehorses, that’s exactly what’s been implemented at one racehorse stud in the Lambourn, an area of the UK famous for racing.

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As if airlines misplacing your luggage isn’t enough, many of us are guilty, at some point in our travels, of losing track of our own bags in the airport. Also, lifting heavy weights across the lengths of terminals is so passé. So, we asked for a solution, and they delivered!

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We may be living on the cusp of an age of electronic clothes. There has been an impressive amount of research that may contribute to this reality, from conductors to power supplies that can be printed or deposited onto flexible surfaces like fabrics.

Many scientists envision that materials such as these will eventually be used to produce full devices that are thinner and lighter than ever before. These devices may be most useful for applications such as personal health tracking. They may also be used in novel displays, which could be interactive or user-controllable.

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You may have heard of advanced Bayesian calculations (ABCs), perhaps in the context of how computers are used to study climate patterns and how these will change in the near future. ABC is the basis for how computers can achieve inference as a result of the data it is fed. Inference is an important part of the process by which predictions that our brains make on an everyday basis match up with the available objective evidence.

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Artificial limbs, such as prosthetic legs or arms, are a common solution nowadays for patients who have gone through the process of amputation. Prosthetic parts of the body are being used for such medical cases since the 16th century and as the centuries pass, their quality is dramatically improving.

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Myelopathy, cervical stenosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), dyspraxia and strokes are just some of the reasons for a complete or partial loss of mobility or motor skills in the hands. These affect both in children and adults, but are especially seen in senior citizens. Everyday tasks such as cooking and doing chores can become a challenge, and in certain cases, depression, social anxiety or feelings of dependency also surface. So, the overall quality of life of such patients are affected.

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Drones – the flying robots with paired propellers you can fly at home – seem to be capable of more and more things by the day. Scientists have recently published work that shows that they can be used to provide a model for the true flying car; not only that, but they can also demonstrate how these hypothetical vehicles can navigate built-up areas and conform to hybrid air/surface traffic management systems. Drone research and development can also be put to good use in aerial photography.

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What if we could generate all the energy required to power the whole of civilization, just using wind turbines? It might sound far-fetched but new research published this week has suggested that this scenario is not entirely unrealistic.

A new location for wind farms

It would however, require some significant changes to the location of wind farms – placing these far out in deep water areas of our oceans, as opposed to on land or relatively near to the shore.

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In just the UK alone, there are an estimated 7,000 road traffic accidents at pedestrian crossings each year, which of course are always been considered the safest way to cross a road. With that in mind, Direct Line, an insurance company have collaborated with the architectural firm Umbrellium to create a new ‘Smart Crossing’ known as the Starling Crossing, designed to help keep pedestrians safer.

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Since Albert Einstein first predicted the existence of gravitational waves in his general theory of relativity, astrophysicists have been on the lookout for these mysterious ‘ripples’, which are released due to the collision of huge objects like black holes. These collisions result in an alteration in the curvature of spacetime, which Einstein predicted could be detected here on Earth.

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Graphene is a fascinating and relatively novel material that may have a whole range of applications in the areas of electronics and engineering in the near future. It is a superconductor that has recently demonstrated the ability to co-exist with silicon to enhance the capabilities of this complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS). These capabilities include photonics: for example, silicon/graphene transistors have recently formed the basis of a sensor that can ‘see’ visible, IR and UV light simultaneously.

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The batteries that power our smartphones, tablets and other similar electronics are a crucial factor that affects how we use them on a daily basis. Despite advances in their technology, they may still discharge at a faster rate than we might like, and interrupt our screen-time when it’s time to recharge them. A longer battery life may mean a larger, more bulky battery which, unfortunately, is out of step with the perceived preference for more streamlined and thinner devices.

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It’s been a busy week for the Hyperloop One transport system. First, a student competition resulted in the winning entrant reaching seriously impressive speeds, a Space X/Tesla test pods then broke that record.

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The flying car is not a thing – although technology enthusiasts born in the 1980s or later may be disappointed by that fact. Many of us may be secretly dissatisfied that having the choice between taking to the roads or the air is not an everyday amenity as yet. The technology that makes the personal or family flying vehicle is still in its very early stages. The most recent Consumer Electronics Show (CES) exhibitions showcased a few single-person planes or helicopters, but these were either concept showcases or prohibitively expensive.

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Although it may be a fact that newer properties run on lesser energy, the amount of emissions, especially CO2, released by homes and buildings are still considerably greater than it should be for our planet.

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